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ACM Transactions on Spatial Algorithms and Systems (ACM TSAS) is a new scholarly journal that publishes the highest quality papers on all aspects of spatial algorithms and systems and closely related disciplines. It has a multi-disciplinary perspective in that it spans a large number of areas where spatial data is manipulated or visualized (regardless of how it is specified - i.e., geometrically or textually) such as geography, geographic information systems (GIS), geospatial and spatiotemporal databases, spatial and metric indexing, location-based services, web-based spatial applications, geographic information retrieval (GIR), spatial reasoning and mining, securing and privacy, as well as the related visual computing areas of computer graphics, computer vision, solid modeling, and visualization where the spatial, geospatial, and spatiotemporal data is central.

The journal welcomes articles on any of the above topics or closely related disciplines in the context of various computing architectures including parallel and distributed networks of computers, multiprocessing computers, or new mobile devices and sensors. The journal welcomes innovative, high-impact articles on emerging or deployed technologies with solid evaluation or evidence of success on a variety of data. System architecture papers will be considered provided that they are accompanied by an appropriate evaluation. Focused surveys on topics relevant to TSAS that make a contribution to a deep understanding of an important area or subarea of geospatial data handling are encouraged. Concise papers may be submitted as technical notes. Technical comments on published articles are also welcome.The journal is committed to the timely dissemination of research results in the area of spatial algorithms and systems.

Potential authors should consult the Information for Authors.

Subject areas

Spatial Information Acquisition

  • Aerial Imaging and Photogrammetry
  • Classification Schemes
  • Collection Standards
  • Conflation
  • Digitization
  • Geocoding
  • Land Surveying and Global Positioning Systems (GPS)
  • Measurements and Sampling
  • Metadata and Standards
  • Positional Accuracy, Consistency, and Data Quality
  • Remote Sensing

Modeling

  • Algebras
  • Fuzzy Set Theory and Rough Sets
  • Data Semantics, including Ontologies
  • Raster vs. Vector
  • Relationships
  • Spatial Information Theory
  • Topology
  • Uncertainty

Spatial and Spatiotemporal Data Structures and Algorithms

  • Computational Geometry
  • Distributed Computation
  • External Memory Data Structures
  • Geoprocessing and Map Production Algorithms
  • Network and Graph Algorithms
  • Parallel Computation
  • Representation Transformation
  • Scale, Generalization, and Aggregation
  • Storage, Access Methods, and Indexing

Analysis, Querying, and Integration

  • Data Integration
  • Data Mining and Pattern Discovery
  • Image Processing and Recognition/Computer Vision Techniques
  • Information Retrieval
  • Location Allocation
  • Network Analysis
  • OLAP
  • Query Processing and Optimization
  • Similarity Search and Approximate Matching
  • Statistical and Geostatistical Analysis

Human Computer Interaction and Visualization

  • 3D Visualization
  • Development Environments
  • Interface Design
  • Map Design and Production
  • Query Languages
  • Spatiotemporal Data Visualization
  • Virtual and Immersive Environments
  • Visual and Gesture Languages

Systems and Architectures

  • Data Stream Management Systems
  • Data Warehouses
  • Database Management Systems
  • Decision Support Systems
  • Digital Libraries
  • Distributed, Parallel Systems, and Interoperability
  • Geographic Information Systems (GIS)
  • Open Systems
  • Performance Evaluation and Benchmarking
  • Remote Sensing and Multimedia Database Systems
  • Sensor Networks and Mobility
  • Simulations
  • Wireless and Ad hoc Networks

Applications

  • Cartography
  • Earth Sciences, Astronomy
  • Emergency and Crisis Management
  • Environmental Monitoring
  • Global Positioning and Location Detection
  • Geosciences
  • Impact Assessment
  • Location-based and Mobile Services
  • Medical Imagery and Atlases
  • Navigation and Route Planning
  • Phenomena Detection and Tracking
  • Public Safety and Homeland Security
  • Real-time Applications
  • Telecommunications
  • Traffic and Transportation
  • Urban Planning and Management
  • Utilities Management
  • Web-based Applications

Spatial Information and Society

  • Data Sharing, Privacy, and Security
  • Economic Aspects
  • Education and Curriculum Development
  • Electronic Government
  • Ethical Aspects
  • Institutional and Inter-institutional Aspects
  • Legal Aspects
  • Standards and Technology Transfer

Editorial Board

Editor-In-Chief

  • Hanan Samet
    hjs at umdedu
    University of Maryland, College Park

Senior Associate Editors

  • Ralf Hartmut Güting
    rhg at fernuni-hagende
    University of Hagen, Germany
    Area: spatial and spatio-temporal databases
  • David Mount
    mount at csumdedu
    University of Maryland, College Park
    Area: computational geometry, geometric data structures
  • Dinesh Manocha
    dm at csuncedu
    University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
    Area: visualization, computer graphics, computer vision
  • Peter Widmayer
    widmayer at infethzch
    ETH, Switzerland
    Area: theory, indexing

Associate Editors

  • Divy Agrawal
    agrawal at csucsbedu
    University of California at Santa Barbara
    Area: multidimensional and distributed spatial databases
  • Lars Arge
    large at madalgoaudk
    MADALGO, Aarhus University, Denmark
    Area: computational geometry, I/O-efficient algorithms
  • Isabel Cruz
    ifc at csuicedu
    University of Illinois at Chicago
    Area: geospatial data integration
  • W. Randolph Franklin
    mail at wrfranklinorg
    Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
    Area: applied geometry
  • Joachim Gudmundsson
    joachimgudmundsson at sydneyeduau
    University of Sydney, Australia
    Area: computational geometry, motion analysis
  • Christopher B. Jones
    cbjones at cscardiffacuk
    Cardiff University, UK
    Area: geographic information retrieval
  • Yaron Kanza
    kanza at cstechnionacil
    Technion, Israel
    Area: location-based services, databases
  • Mohamed Mokbel
    mokbel at csumnedu
    University of Minnesota
    Area: spatial databases, location-based services, GIS
  • Peter Scheuermann
    pscheuer2008 at gmailcom
    Northwestern University
    Area: databases, GIS, mobile computing
  • Cyrus Shahabi
    shahabi at uscedu
    University of Southern California
    Area: spatial databases
  • Egemen Tanin
    etanin at unimelbeduau
    University of Melbourne, Australia
    Area: spatial databases
  • Goce Trajcevski
    goce at eecsnorthwesternedu
    Northwestern University
    Area: spatial databases, mobile computing
  • Agnes Voisard
    AgnesVoisard at fu-berlinde
    Free University of Berlin
    Area: spatial databases
  • Ouri Wolfson
    wolfson at csuicedu
    University of Illinois Chicago
    Area: mobile computing
  • Walid G. Aref
    aref at cspurdueedu
    Purdue University
    Area: spatial query processing and indexing
  • Horst Bischof
    bischof at icgtugrazat
    Graz University of Technology
    Area: computer vision
  • Leila De Floriani
    deflo at disiunigeit
    University of Genova
    Area: geometric modeling, visualization
  • Michael Gertz
    gertz at informatikuni-heidelbergde
    Heidelberg University
    Area: spatial databases
  • Christian S. Jensen
    csj at csaaudk
    Aalborg University
    Area: spatio-temporal databases
  • Craig Knoblock
    knoblock at isiedu
    University of Southern California
    Area: geospatial data integration
  • John Keyser
    keyser at cstamuedu
    Texas A & M
    Area: solid modeling
  • Shawn Newsam
    snewsam at ucmercededu
    University of California Merced
    Area: remote sensing, GIS
  • Markus Schneider
    mschneid at ciseufledu
    University of Florida
    Area: spatial and spatio-temporal databases
  • Claudio Silva
    csilva at nyuedu
    New York University
    Area: visualization, geometry processing, computer graphics
  • Paul Torrens
    torrens at geosimulationcom
    University of Maryland
    Area: GIS
  • Marc van Kreveld
    mjvankreveld at uunl
    Utrecht University, the Netherlands
    Area: computational geometry, algorithms
  • Robert Weibel
    robertweibel at geouzhch
    University of Zurich
    Area: computational cartography, motion analysis
  • Moustafa Youssef
    moustafayoussef at ejustedueg
    Egypt-Japan University of Science and Technology
    Area: location-based services, mobile computing

TSAS Information Director

  • Kenneth Weiss
    kweiss at llnlgov
    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Editorial Assistant

  • Sharron McElroy
    smcelroy at csumdedu
    University of Maryland, College Park

ACM Headquarters Staff

  • Laura Lander
    lander at hqacmorg
    ACM Journals Manager

Information for Authors

Scope

ACM Transactions on Spatial Algorithms and Systems (ACM TSAS) is a new scholarly journal that publishes the highest quality papers on all aspects of spatial algorithms and systems and closely related disciplines. It has a multi-disciplinary perspective in that it spans a large number of areas where spatial data is manipulated or visualized (regardless of how it is specified - i.e., geometrically or textually) such as geography, geographic information systems (GIS), geospatial and spatiotemporal databases, spatial and metric indexing, location-based services, web-based spatial applications, geographic information retrieval (GIR), spatial reasoning and mining, securing and privacy, as well as the related visual computing areas of computer graphics, computer vision, solid modeling, and visualization where the spatial, geospatial, and spatiotemporal data is central.

ACM TSAS is published quarterly (four issues a year).

Submission Types

The journal welcomes articles on any of the above topics or closely related disciplines in the context of various computing architectures including parallel and distributed networks of computers, multiprocessing computers, or new mobile devices and sensors. The journal welcomes innovative, high-impact articles on emerging or deployed technologies with solid evaluation or evidence of success on a variety of data. System architecture papers will be considered provided that they are accompanied by an appropriate evaluation. Focused surveys on topics relevant to TSAS that make a contribution to a deep understanding of an important area or subarea of geospatial data handling are encouraged. Concise papers may be submitted as technical notes. Technical comments on published articles are also welcome. The journal is committed to the timely dissemination of research results in the area of spatial algorithms and systems.

Original Material Policy

TSAS will encourage submissions which have not been published or submitted in any form elsewhere, and submissions which may significantly contribute to opening up new and potentially important areas of research and development. TSAS will do this by giving earliest possible publication dates for such submissions once they have been accepted.

Publication Policies

The ACM Publications Policies page addresses issues of plagiarism, copyrights, simultaneous submissions, including the recently added Policy on Author Representations.

Manuscript Workflow

All submissions will be reviewed using a single-blind review policy. The identity of the authors are revealed to the reviewers, but the identity of the reviewers will not be revealed to the authors.

All submissions are examined by the Editor-in-Chief who performs an initial determination if the submission falls into the scope/charter of the Transactions and if so, assigns it to the an appropriate Senior Associate Editor who performs a closer examination of the suitability of the submission for the Transactions and if so forwards the paper to one of the Associate Editors with knowledge of the paper's topic who in turn assigns to a minimum of three and a maximum of five reviewers to performs the review. The Associate Editors will make an initial recommendation to the appropriate Senior Associate Editor based on the recommendations of the reviewers. This recommendation will be a accept, reject, or a return to the author for reviews that seek clarification of some issues in the paper. The Senior Associate Editors will in turn make a recommendation to the Editor-in-Chief that takes these issues into account, and who will make the ultimate decision on the disposition of the paper.

Formatting

TSAS permits electronic submissions for editorial review only in LaTeX, or MS Word format. Use of the ACM Journals/Transactions LaTeX style is encouraged to ensure proper formatting. ACM also admits other formats for electronic submission of papers, including Microsoft Word.

TSAS will discourage excessively long papers (longer than 50 pages in TSAS format---including figures, references, etc. but not including any appendices), and unnecessary digressions even in shorter papers. This is to motivate the authors to bring out the essence of their papers more clearly, to make it easier for the reviewers and readers, and to allow TSAS to publish more papers in any given issue. Use the least number of pages necessary to adequately describe your idea.

Conflicts of Interest

As an author you have the option to identify preferred or non-preferred reviewers. Please keep the following conflict of interest guidelines in selecting these reviewers. You have a potential conflict of interest if any of the preferred reviewers has one of the following relationships with you:

  • The reviewer works at the same institution as you or one of your co-authors.
  • The reviewers have been directly involved in the work and will be receiving credit in some way. If the reviewer is a member of your or one of your co-author's thesis committee, and the paper is about their thesis work, then the reviewer is involved.
  • You suspect that others might see a conflict of interest in their involvement. For example, even though Microsoft Research in Seattle and Beijing are in some ways more distant than Berkeley and MIT, there is likely to be a perception that they are "both Microsoft", so folks from one branch of the company should not review papers from another branch of the company.
  • The reviewer has collaborated with you or one of your co-authors in the past three years (more or less). Collaboration is usually defined as having written a paper or grant proposal together, although you should use your judgment. For instance, being coauthors in either a course or survey paper generally should not in itself lead to a conflict of interest.
  • The reviewer is your or one of your coauthor’s MS/PhD advisor. Funding agencies typically consider advisees to represent a lifetime conflict of interest.

For Papers (co-)Authored by ACM TSAS Editor-in-Chief

The EiC will submit the paper to a Senior Associate Editor who is specifically designated for this purpose and explicitly identified in the web pages for that journal. The designated Senior Associate Editor must have agreed to accept this responsibility and should not be a collaborator of the EiC or from the same organization as the EiC.

The Senior Associate Editor designated in step 1 (say Alice) will not process the paper herself, but will hand it to another Associate Editor (say Bob) whose identity will not be disclosed to the EiC. Bob will obtain reviews and make all decisions regarding processing of the paper (such as reject, requires major revision and second review, conditional accept, accept, etc.) and will convey these decisions to the EiC by way of Alice. Alice will keep the identity of Bob anonymous from the EiC, and Bob will keep the identity of the reviewers anonymous from Alice.

In case of guest edited special issues, such as based on papers invited from conferences, the guest editor will make the final decision directly but will anonymize all reviewer information in corresponding with the authors, including the EiC.

In order to avoid the appearance of impropriety, existing standards of acceptability must be rigorously applied when considering papers (co-)authored by EiCs. Papers which are marginal in any way should be rejected. (This policy is that recommended by the ACM Publications Board; see Conflict of Interest Policy For Papers Authored By ACM Editors-in-Chief.) The EiC has appointed Professor Peter Widmayer as the designated Associate Editor.

For Papers (co-)Authored by ACM TSAS Associate Editors or Senior Associate Editors

The EiC will submit the paper to a Senior Associate Editor to handle, as is the normal procedure. However, the identity of the Senior Associate Editor handling the paper will not be revealed to the authors. Instead, the EiC will serve as an intermediator in all communications between the Senior Associate Editor handling the submission and the authors.

All other aspects of the handling of such submissions will follow normal procedure.

Submitting Extended Versions of Conference Proceedings

TSAS will publish outstanding papers which are "major value-added extensions" of papers previously published in conferences; that is, TSAS will not automatically reject papers that are major extensions to previously published conference papers. These papers will go through the normal review process.

A submitted manuscript that is based on one or more previous publications by one or more of the authors should have at least 30% new material. The new material should be content material: For example, it should not just be straightforward proofs or performance figures that do not offer substantial, new insights. The submitted manuscript affords an opportunity to present additional results, for example by considering new alternatives or by delving into some of the issues listed in the previous publication(s) as future work. At the same time, it is not required that the submitted manuscript contain all of the material from the published paper(s). To the contrary: only enough material need be included from the published paper to set the context and render the new material comprehensible.

For more information, please refer to ACM’s policy on prior publication (http://www.acm.org/publications/policies/sim_submissions). Note that articles should have at least 30% new material instead of 25%.

Review Cycle

The TSAS Editorial Board is committed to providing an editorial decision within five months. This turnaround time is defined to start with the day the paper was submitted electronically and extends to the day the decision was sent to the author. It is expected that the average turnaround time will be even shorter, so prospective authors can expect a fast review of their submission. TSAS editors will also regard a submission to have been withdrawn if its required revision is not submitted within six months of the revision notification.

Publication Policies

The ACM Publications Policies page addresses issues of plagiarism, copyrights, simultaneous submissions, etc.

Information for Reviewers

Thank you for agreeing to review a paper for ACM TSAS. The editorial board of TSAS is committed to publishing the most interesting and stimulating papers on spatial algorithms and systems. We do this by reviewing papers with great care and expertise, and carrying out that reviewing and publishing efficiently and rapidly.

Efficient reviewing is essential to the success of TSAS. To publish papers in a timely fashion, we allow two months from receipt of the paper to prepare a TSAS review. It is important that you commit to this timeframe. Otherwise the entire publication pipeline begins to slow down.

Encourage diversity in our published papers and you will help make TSAS interesting. We want to also encourage creative and imaginative papers, those that stimulate and provoke as well as enlighten. We will stand in the mainstream, but also welcome papers that are clever, or surprising, or present radical new directions for spatial algorithms and systems.

Review compassionately and you can make the difference between a mediocre paper lost forever and one that is revised to publication quality and contributes to the field. Please write reviews that are meaningful for the author. Speak in particulars, not generalities. Never characterize the authors. Give constructive criticism when discussing a problem. If there are major flaws, identify them as clearly as possible.

Be positive in order to make the best impact; consider each paper in its best possible sense. Look for the most useful and interesting ideas. Try to make suggestions to the author that will make the paper as good as it can be, whether it is already wonderful or in great need of help.

Protect Confidentiality

As a TSAS reviewer, you have the responsibility to protect the confidentiality of the ideas represented in the submitted papers. TSAS submissions are by their very nature not published documents. The work is considered new or proprietary by the authors; otherwise they would not have submitted it. Protection of the ideas in the paper you receive means:

  • Do not show the paper to anyone else, including colleagues or students, unless you have asked them to write a review, or to help with your review.
  • Do not show videos to non-reviewers.
  • Do not use ideas from the paper to develop new ones, until the paper has been published.

Avoid Conflicts of Interest

Even though you would, of course, act impartially on any paper, there should be absolutely no question about the impartiality of the review. Thus, if you are assigned a paper where your review would create a possible conflict of interest, you should return the paper and not submit a review. Conflicts of interest are similar in spirit to those that an author has with preferred reviewers including (but not limited to) situations in which:

  • The reviewer works at the same institution as one of the authors.
  • The reviewer has been directly involved in the work and will be receiving credit in some way. If the reviewer is a member of one of the authors’ thesis committee, and the paper is about his or her thesis work, then the reviewer is involved.
  • The reviewer suspects that others might see a conflict of interest in their involvement. For example, even though Microsoft Research in Seattle and Beijing are in some ways more distant than Berkeley and MIT, there is likely to be a perception that they are "both Microsoft", so folks from one division of a company should not review papers from another division of the same company.
  • The reviewer collaborated with one of the authors in the past three years (more or less). Collaboration is usually defined as having written a paper or a grant proposal together, although the reviewer should use their judgment. For instance, being coauthors in either a course or survey paper generally should not in itself lead to a conflict of interest.
  • The reviewer was the MS/PhD advisor of one of the authors or the MS/PhD advisee of one of the authors. Funding agencies typically consider advisees to represent a lifetime conflict of interest.
  • The reviewer has unpublished work that would get scooped by the current submission because it tackles the same problem using a similar approach. At a minimum, such a cross-reviewing conflict should be declared to the editor in a private comment.

Remain Anonymous

All reviewers are expected to maintain anonymity forever. In particular, it is never appropriate for a reviewer to reveal himself or herself to the authors of an accepted paper, as this could be perceived as an attempt to curry favor. Requesting citations primarily to one's own work may thwart anonymity, so should be carefully considered. Be professional

Belittling or sarcastic comments may help display one's wit, but they are unnecessary in the reviewing process. The most valuable comments in a review are those that help the authors understand the shortcomings of their work and how they might improve it.

Coming soon…